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the crisis over, yes, the fiscal cliff. and origin tina's rating is slashed over five notches. we'll speak to a bondholder who once represented the country's creditors. >> you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the globe. >>> as we get into the trading session here in europe, you can see behind me decliners outpacing advancers by about a 4-1 ratio, with stocks shedding about a third of a percent. we'll get to more of that shortly. first take a look at the forces individually to get a sense of where we're seeing the selling pressure and it is pretty much consistent. there's the ibex 35 down .7 of a percent. the ftse down about a third of a percent. not many green spots to find. yesterday we saw that rally in peripheral debt. today we're actually seeing firmer prices across the board, so whether the u.s. down there or italy and spain here in the periphery, 4.7%, 6%, remarkable there, level for spain even today as the country's banks are being more fully examined in light of the national examination plans. the dollar/yen pulling back about half a percent
house speaker john boehner and harry reid this weekend for avoid efforts on fiscal cliff. on wednesday president obama will seek more input from top ceos, including gold man's lloyd blankfein and caterpillar's doug owner hill man. a number will travel to washington to try to reach a deficit cutting deal as part of the fix the debt campaign. so all things fiscal cliff still pre-dominate. we have a time clock that's quickly running out. how important is it that we get an agreement before the end of the year? >> this is like the debt ceiling argument. people got into a panic. that's something we even imposed on ourselves to decide that the debt shouldn't go too high. so it's not a bad thing. same with the fiscal cliff. what are we saying with the fiscal cliff? we're saying the economy might be revealed to be what it's actually doing because we'll take away the artificial supports because we think it's held any enough now to maybe after itself. that might entail a step drop because at the moment we're giving these tax breaks, but we're doing it out of our saving. >> but the point isn't jus
.s., congress returns from a thanksgiving break he with talks to resolve the fiscal cliff. with no action by lawmakers and president obama, around 600 billion in tax hikes a and spending cuts would take effect in january. republicans and democrats are still in odds over the cause to raise taxes on the wealthiest and cutting on programs like medicare. but both sides saying they're willing to compromise. >> you have to raise additional revenues. there are ways of doing that. >> republicans always put revenue on the table. democrats always promise to cut spending. we never cut spending. what i'm looking for is more revenue for entitlement reform. >> the house speaker has called for a short term fix to overt the fiscal cliff so congress can work on a bigger deal in 2013. they naed to cut out a package that includes revenue hikes and spending cuts by the end of the year. >> americans have been out shopping early and often. almost 140 million kmers hit the stores or shopped online between thursday and sunday. that's up 6% from last year. >> almost a quarter billion shoppers will have been onlin
the fiscal cliff. >> the economic confidence of both market participants and the general public will actually be influenced by the extent to which our political system proves able to deliver a reasonable solution with a minimum of uncertainty and delay. >> peter schiff says bernanke and the fed pose a bigger threat to the u.s. economy than the fiscal cliff. >> if it wasn't for his accommodation, all the qes, we wouldn't have to go over the fiscal cliff. in fact, ultimately, because of what the fed has done, we're going to have to go over a much bigger cliff as part of the solution to solve the problems that the fed helped create by allowing the government to get so big. >> is that fair, craig? >> it certainly is fair that long-term, what we've done with monetary policy could be a challenge. it could be a very big challenge. i don't think saying that if we -- if the fed hadn't done what they'd done, you wouldn't have to go off the cliff. i think you still have to deal with the fact that government spending has been too fast over the past -- well, since the recession ended. our gdp has grown at
such a thing as a fiscal cliff like you have in the u.s. the old budget simply takes over up a new budget has been agreed on. so there is no financing disaster in the middle of it. the curious crux to this is if this old budget takes over because of the in-build qui sooif inflation factor in there, it's actually than the new budget they're debating right now, so all the countries pushing for the cut and even putting the threat on the veto on the table, they will actually chief the opposite. we'll keep on spending more even then with a sort of slide budget increase that the eu commission put on the table. and as to where the negotiations stand, i think at the moment the budget talks, pardon to be cynical, but political posturing on the various side than the actual effects in there. because if you look at the mound that the various countries put up into the budget, i think like 9 billion and that is already one of the biggest, we just save banks and sovereigns for hundreds of billions of bailout funds. so in terms of the actual money, this is absolute small cheese. >> absolutely is. silvia, for
a favorable external environment, meaning u.s. not going into this deep due to the fiscal cliff. and also signs of improvement in asia. >> meanwhile the french pmi says the survey there suggests a 0.7% gdp drop in quarter 4 for france. >> that seems quite large. we've seen in recent quarters numbers out of front which were higher than suggested by the pmis, however, they then revised down q2. so i'm looking for a contraction of 0.3 in france quarter on quarter in q4. >> what's going to change things, ricardo, what will turn things around? >> i think on the policy front, not much one can effect. fiscal policy will remain tight next year. the ecb doesn't have a huge margin to ease policy. i'm expecting that they will cut the refinancing rate. but i don't think it will go to negative rates for now. so they can only do perhaps 25 basis points on the main refinancing rate. the omt bond buying facility can only be activated if one of the countries apply. and it doesn't look like neither spain nor italy will apply anytime soon. and anyway the bond yields have declined quite a bit compared to jul
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6